Rural America in the 2000s: Population | Daily Yonder | Keep It Rural

Rural America in the 2000s: Population | Daily Yonder | Keep It Rural

Robert Gallardo assesses population trends for rural counties during this county in today's Daily Yonder, summarizing:

Rural counties gained only 2.9% in population in the 2000s, compared to a national average of 9.1%. But that doesn't tell the whole story.

Gallardo explains that Rural America is becoming more diverse. Most interesting to me are the patterns of where population growth and loss are occurring. The two noted areas of growth are in exurban communities, and in the mountain west.

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Ten Strategic Imperatives

Ten Strategic Imperatives
  1. Identify and meet customer needs
  2. Provide exceptional customer service
  3. Aggressively promote your system and all alternatives to driving alone
  4. Be green to get the green (Funding)
  5. Measure and report your real impact
  6. Advance the community conversation on community transit
  7. Make business part of transit’s business
  8. Create partnerships to serve the entire community
  9. Help one another sing our industry’s praises
  10. Share our collective experiences and insights
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Transportation vision articulated on Montana Public Radio

James Corless, director of T4America, recently visited Missoula and got a chance to sit down with Edward O’Brien of Montana Public Radio. The full length interview aired Friday evening, September 25, on Montana Evening News. Follow this link to hear James discuss community design, safe streets, transit, Amtrak and high-speed rail as components of federal transportation reform: http://www.mtpr.net/program_info/2009-09-25-132 James’ segment starts in 13:41 into the newscast.
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Current Transportation in the news August 11, 2009

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle wrote a good editorial today about the need for more investment in bikeable, walkable, livable communities. It's a follow-up on an article they did two weeks ago about the Transportation for America campaign, where I was quoted. I have included the two articles below. Our Opinion: 1950s-era policy must be updated for 2009 life Bikeable, walkable, livable
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Mileage-based fee can help if done right

Mileage-based fee can help if done right

Today I reviewed the Oregon Department of Transportation's mileage-based fee pilot study. This structure can be effective in paying for our road system and addressing other policy issues. The study found success with congestion pricing: a 22% reduction in rush hour miles traveled among the people subject to congestion fees compared to those who were not, along with an overall reduction of miles traveled.

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The cost of fares

The cost of fares

The Streamline bus system in Bozeman started as a fare free system in 2006. Fare free system benefits both riders and non-riders because it leads to increased use of transit and less congestion, fewer parking problems, less air quality problems, and less carbon emissions. Furthermore, charging a fare would not improve the revenue stream. 

Why are passengers forced to fork over handfuls of change every time they board a bus, or to pay escalating costs for transit passes? Other social goods, from schools to health care to the road system, are funded by the broader public through taxes, and daily use is free of charge. Why not the same for public transit, especially since charging for it tends to penalize the poorest in society, and encourage polluting behavior?

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