Rural America in the 2000s: Population | Daily Yonder | Keep It Rural

Robert Gallardo / Census All rural U.S. counties and whether they gained or lost population from 2000 to 2009

Robert Gallardo / Census
All rural U.S. counties and whether they gained or lost population from 2000 to 2009

Robert Gallardo assesses population trends for rural counties during this county in today's Daily Yonder, summarizing:

Rural counties gained only 2.9% in population in the 2000s, compared to a national average of 9.1%. But that doesn't tell the whole story.

Gallardo explains that Rural America is becoming more diverse. Most interesting to me are the patterns of where population growth and loss are occurring. The two noted areas of growth are in exurban communities, and in the mountain west.

Gallatin County, where Bozeman is the county seat, had the 17th largest population increase among rural counties between 2000 and 2009, and the largest change in Montana. 

Also in the Greater Yellowstone, Teton County, Idaho is the second fastest growing rural county in the country. The 55.6% population change is driven by people working in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and commuting over Teton Pass. The local community has been trying to deal with the impacts of the growth, including the implementation of a commuter bus over the pass. Unfortunately, Idaho has no local taxing authority, and the state doesn't put any money towards public transportation, so every penny has to be scrounged together to try to leverage federal programs. Meanwhile, they are building roads and new suburbs, but maintaining and serving them are a bit more difficult to fund.

The final Greater Yellowstone high growth county is Sublette County, Wyoming, fifth on the list with a 48.5% population change over nine years.

via Rural America in the 2000s: Population | Daily Yonder | Keep It Rural.